Writing Conference Report: LTUE 2019

Every year for several years now, I’ve gone to the Life, the Universe, and Everything sci-fi/fantasy conference in Utah. It’s sort of a writing conference, and sort of not. They also have art classes, and a game room, and presentations of academic papers, and meet-and-greets.

But I mostly go for the writing classes. And the business classes. And the worldbuilding classes. And the oh-that-sounds-super-cool classes. Two of my family members got to attend a weapons class with real weapons. They raved for weeks.

First, a little practical advice.

Wear good shoes and comfortable clothes/hairstyle. Take food to eat, especially if you aren’t going to take an actual lunch break. Look for a freebies table. Talk to people–lots of people. If weight bothers you AT ALL, slim down your bag to lighter than you think you can carry all day. Ask experienced attendees which bathroom tends to have shorter lines, and use it immediately after class. Drink lots of water (if you lightened your bag, take a small bottle and refill it every hour). If you have business cards, bring them. If the class you want to take is full, try something else or find someone for a conversation.

I’m going to have to split my best take-away advice from the classes I attended this year. I’ll put the business notes in a different post. Here’s the worldbuilding and craft notes. If the class was a panel, I didn’t list the speakers or keep track of who said what.

Foraging, by Cedar Sanderson
Some plants are topically poisonous (absorb through skin).
Never test edibility by tasting.
Blue-colored berries are probably fine, red be cautious, white avoid.
Some things will slowly make you sick, so just because you ate it once and didn’t die doesn’t actually mean it’s safe.
Animals are a better source of emergency food than plants.
Predators are usually not yummy.
Some animals have poison glands. Even deer have scent glands that can spoil the meat if punctured (same for gut).
Fuzz/hair is usually toxic /nasty.
Just because an animal ate it doesn’t mean it’s safe for you.

Objective Correlative  (accent on the second syllable of Correlative), by Rosalyn Eves
Telling emotion is worst, showing is better. Putting the reader inside your characters to feel the same emotions themselves is better.
5 ways to do that:
Objects (readers must understand importance)
Metaphor
Situation (setting, events, etc)
Chain of events (action-reaction)
Movement or gesture
Build up moment until reader is immersed and feels like the character.
Don’t overuse; save for important moments when you can slow down.
(I left the class thinking, “THIS. I want to learn to do THIS.”)

Suspense
Every chapter should have conflict. Some should still be rest chapters
Ticking time bomb + obstacles
Switch from high tension to low and back again to reset the tension
Reader knowing something character does not, creates tension
Don’t withhold information the pov character knows

The Beginner’s Guide to Self-Editing, by Kelsy Thompson
A great class, but since she offered her slides to attendees, I didn’t take notes. Also, it was a two-hour class and she moved fast enough through enough material that taking notes wasn’t very practical. If you get the chance to take the class, I recommend it. She covered development editing first (big-picture story items) and then moved down to line editing (actual language) and proofreading (typos).
I did like her encouragement to aim for professional but forget about unattainable perfection.

Beats & Microbeats, by Devri Walls
For intense speed, shorten sentences.
Slow beats use longer, more descriptive sentences.
Do not overdo or everything will be flat
If action or romance scenes are lacking, slow down!
Dialogue: speech tags and action slow scenes. Cut for faster scenes.

4-part Pacing, by J. Scott Savage
Plot is events, pacing is timing
Use foreshadowing for something ELSE and your true twist will slip through.
1st quarter draws interest.
2nd quarter delivers on promise.
3rd quarter is heart of story.
4th quarter is climax.
There is a turning point at every quarter.

Backstory
Give the minimum your reader has to know, in time for them to use it. Not Tolkien!
Walk through as the character would, and be subtle.
Skip As-you-know-Bob (conversations held only to explain things to the reader)

Showing vs Telling
Boil things to the most important showing details.
Naming an emotion is usually telling.
Which parts do the reader need to feel (show) VS just know (tell)?
First draft is worry-free zone. Go ahead & tell, & edit it later.
War That Saved My Life (book): look for showing.
First chapter of The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe.

Foreshadowing
If you disguise the foreshadowing as something else, it can hide your real purpose.
Mix truth and lie to confuse readers.
Using multiple techniques is trickier.
Let some red herrings be true to throw readers off balance.

Sagging Middle
If you aren’t having fun anymore, back up and make a different choice.
The middle is the main part of the story.
Use MICE quotient to determine what kind of obstacles you need.

Books That Need Sequels

Don’t you hate it when authors stop a series you like before it’s actually finished? I do! So here are some books that I think the authors should hurry up and sequel already. (I’m excluding relatively new releases that might already have unannounced sequels planned.)

If there ARE sequels for these, tell me, would you? I’ve been waiting…

The Nascenza Conspiracy, by V. Briceland.

Ordinary Magic, by Caitlen Rubino-Bradway.

Perception, by Kim Harrington

Timekeeper, by Alexandra Monir

The Darkness Dwellers, by Kirsten Miller

A Cold Black Wave, by Timothy H. Scott

Dragon Run, by Patrick Mathews

Freaks, by Kieran Larwood

The Watcher in the Shadows, by Chris Moriarty

Treecat Wars, by David Weber.

The Last Enchanter, by Laurisa White Reyes

The Seers, by Julianna Scott

Tristi Pinkston’s mysteries

Silent Starsong, and The Earl’s Childe, by T. J. Wooldridge

The Black Stars, by Dad Krokos

The Tree of Water, by Elizabeth Haydon

Silver in the Blood, by Jessica Day George

The Sign of the Cat, by Lynne Jonell

(editor’s note: I stopped in 2016, so updates should pick up there)

If you have any pull with these authors, tell them to get on the ball! 😉

What books do YOU want to have sequels?

Happy reading,

M. C. Lee

 

Emotion Thesaurus, Second Edition

I’ve been using the original Emotion Thesaurus for a year. My critique partners recommended it when they got tired of trying to explain how to add emotion to my story. And they were right; it’s a great resource anytime I think, “Now, how can I show what my characters are feeling? How can I make my reader feel their emotions?”

So when I scored an Advance Reader Copy of the second edition, I was intrigued and excited. What would the difference be? Would the authors add new emotions? Would there be other changes?

Yes, there are new emotions. Yes, there are other changes. And they’re great!

Besides the old sections of effectively mixing verbal, physical, and thoughts, and a reminder about moderation, there is now an intro section on baseline behavior and personalities, to remind you that different characters will respond differently to the same events, depending on their inherent traits. There’s a section on speech patterns, so your characters don’t all sound alike. There’s a section on subtext that I desperately needed…

Within the emotion entries, there used to be a “Could escalate to” reference that is still there but expanded. Now there is also a “Could de-escalate to” reference that would have made my life a lot easier if it had been in the first edition. Another new section in each emotion entry is a list of associated power verbs. Yes! Now I don’t have to strain my brain trying to think of action verbs to fit the emotion, because the authors have already done the hard work for me! I’m so excited. You might have noticed…

A few of the old emotions have been split to differentiate between subtly different feelings. Some definitions have been improved. A lot of new emotions have been added. I won’t list them all, but some of my favorites include:

  • appall
  • apprehension
  • betrayed
  • certainty
  • despair
  • devastation
  • discouraged
  • grief
  • homesick
  • horror
  • hysteria
  • moved
  • obsessed
  • pleased
  • powerlessness
  • self-pity
  • shock
  • stunned
  • unappreciated
  • validated
  • valued
  • vengeful
  • vulnerable
  • wanderlust
  • wistful

For several of those, I sighed. Why didn’t I have those when I was writing my last book? At least I have them for my works-in-progress. *rub hands together with glee*

Thanks, Angela & Becky, for making my stories better and my writing easier. And thanks for the sneak peek.

Now, all you writers out there, I’m not going to tell you to buy the book, but if you struggle with expressing emotion on the page, or if your readers say they don’t FEEL it, maybe this would be a good tool for you. It is for me.

For  more information, you can go here.

M. C. Lee

Favorite Religious Books

Here are some of my favorite religious books, not counting the scriptures, which would come at the top of the otherwise random list:

Bad Guys of the Book of Mormon, by Dennis Gaunt

Your Happily Ever After, by Dieter F. Uchtdorf

12 Keys to Developing Spiritual Maturity, by Richard G Moore

Finding God in the Land of Narnia, by Kurt Bruner

Brent L. Top

Standing for Something, by Gordon B. Hinckley

Repentance, by Ezra Taft Benson

Divine Signatures: The Confirming Hand of God, by Gerald N Lund

My Soul Delighteth in the Scriptures, by H. Wallace Goddard

Created for Greater Things, by Jeffery R. Holland

House of Learning, by Richard M Walker

Talking with God: Divine Conversations That Transform Daily Life, by Robert L. Millet

To Lead as Jesus Led, by Eric G. Stephen

A Quiet Heart, Patricia C. Holland

Jesus the Christ, by James E. Talmage

Believing Christ: The Parable of the Bicycle and Other Good News, by Stephen E Robinson

C.S. Lewis (some are religious books, some are not)

The Legal Cases in the Book of Mormon, by John W. Welch (density warning)

Men of Valor: The Powerful Impact of a Righteous Man, by Robert L. Millet

The Cost of Winning: Coming in First Across the Wrong Finish Line, by Dean Hughes

The Infinite Atonement, by Tad R. Callister

Robert I. Eaton

Amazed by Grace, by Sheri Dew

Brad Wilcox

Raising an Army of Helaman’s Warriors: A Guide for Parents to Prepare the Greatest Generation of Missionaries, by Mark D. Ogletree

John Bytheway

Mary Ellen Edmunds

Covenant Hearts, by Bruce C. Hafen

What Would a Holy Woman Do?, by Wendy Watson Nelson

Consider the Blessings, by Thomas S. Monson

Michael S. Wilcox

Hard Times and Holy Places, by Kristen Warner Belcher

Echoes and Evidences of the Book of Mormon, by John W. Welch

How?: Essential Skills for Living the Gospel, by John Hilton

Great News!

It’s been a long time getting here, but I’m pleased to announce the publication of my first book! You can find more information on Goodreads, Amazon, Kobo, Apple Books, Barnes & Noble, Scribd, Google Play, and more. You can find links for the ebook at many of the stores here.

The ebook is available for libraries on OverDrive, if you’d like to encourage one to stock it. 🙂

Print copies will be available in a couple of months. If you want a signed copy, contact me in person for now. (Later, I’ll figure out another way to get signed copies on a broader basis.) You can also buy an unsigned copy directly through me, if you like. (Same price for you, more profit for me.)

Should you buy the ebook or wait for the print version? And how soon? That depends– do you want an ebook or a paperback? Buy the one you want (ebooks give better royalties, so don’t let the cheaper price bother you). If you love reading YA fantasy, buy it as soon as you’d like. If you’re just trying to help me, please wait 2-3 months until fantasy readers have created appropriate other-people-liked-this connections. If you really want the marketing lecture, let me know. 😉 Another way to help me, if that’s your goal, is to ask your library to order it, and then check it out.

I dream of having an audio version someday, but my publisher says that will have to wait. I’ll let you know when it happens. 🙂

So what’s the bad news? Well, the ARCs (Advance Reader Copies) are no longer available, although you can still sign up on my list for an ARC to the next book. And the print copies aren’t quite ready. I think the balance is definitely on the side of the good news.

And if you like the book, please give it a nice review and refer it to a friend. 😀

Happy reading!

M. C. Lee

Favorite NonFiction Books

Here are my favorite non-fiction books and authors (including biographies), in random order. For favorite writing, family/parenting, religious, or personality/behavior/cognition books, please see separate posts. I didn’t include homeschooling books, but if anyone is interested in that list, let me know & I’ll make a post.

Miscellaneous Books

Biblioholism: The Literary Addiction, by Tom Raabe

Bandersnatch: C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien and the Creative Collaboration of the Inklings, by Diana Pavlac Glyer

The Trigger Point Therapy Workbook: Your Self-Treatment Guide for Pain Relief, by Clair Davies

Foam Rolling Guru, by Jason van den Berg

The Naturally Clean Home: 101 Safe and Easy Herbal Formulas for Nontoxic Cleansers, by Karyn Siegel-Maier

Business, Careers, and Finance Books

What Color Is Your Parachute? 2009: A Practical Manual for Job-Hunters and Career-Changers, by Richard Nelson Bolles

Built to Last; Good to Great; and Good to Great & the Social Sectors, by James C. Collins

The Mormon Way of Doing Business: Leadership and Success Through Faith and Family, by Jeff Benedict

The Total Money Makeover: A Proven Plan for Financial Fitness, by Dave Ramsey

The Making of A Well – Designed Business: Turn Inspiration into Action, by LuAnn Nigara

The Young Entrepreneur’s Guide to Starting and Running a Business, by Steve Mariati

Start and Run a Profitable Home-Based Business: Your Step-by-Step, First-Year Guide, by Edna Sheedy

Start Your Own Business: The Only Start-Up Book You’ll Ever Need, by Rieva Lesonsky

AMA Complete Guide to Marketing Research for Small Business, by Holly Edmunds

Do-It-Yourself Direct Marketing: Secrets for Small Business, by Mark S. Bacon

Complete Idiot’s Guide to Starting an Online Business, by Frank Fiore

The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Starting a Home-Based Business, by Barbara Weltman

Camping Books

Beyond Backpacking: Ray Jardine’s Guide to Lightweight Hiking

Appalachian Trail Thru-Hikers’ Companion, by Leslie Mass

Backpacking: Essential Skills to Advanced Techniques, by Victoria Steele Logue

The Appalachian Trail Backpacker’s Planning Guide, by Victoria Steele Logue

Trail Safe: Averting Threatening Human Behavior in the Outdoors, by Michael Bane

Cookbooks

Pressure Perfect: Two Hour Taste in Twenty Minutes Using Your Pressure Cooker, by Lorna J. Sass

How to Repair Food, by Marina Bear (the only one of these cookbooks I actually own…)

What Einstein Told His Cook: Kitchen Science Explained, by Robert L. Wolke

The Thru-Hiker’s Handbook: Georgia to Maine, by Dan Bruce

Backpack Gourmet: Good Hot Grub You Can Make at Home, Dehydrate, and Pack for Quick, Easy, and Healthy Eating on the Trail, by Linda Frederick Yaffe

Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day: The Discovery That Revolutionizes Home Baking, by Jeff Hertzberg

Not Your Mother’s Food Storage: Store the Food You Use Every Day, by Kathy Bray

Science & History Books

And Then You’re Dead: What Really Happens If You Get Swallowed by a Whale, Are Shot from a Cannon, or Go Barreling Over Niagara, by Cody Cassidy

Packing for Mars, by Mary Roach

Animal Weapons: The Evolution of Battle, by Douglas J. Emlen

What If?: Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions, by Randall Munroe

The Ghost Map: The Story of London’s Most Terrifying Epidemic – and How It Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World, by Steven Johnson

Seven Miracles That Saved America: Why They Matter and Why We Should Have Hope, by Chris Stewart

The Miracle of Freedom: Seven Tipping Points That Saved the World, by Chris Stewart

Biographies

The Boys in the Boat: The True Story of an American Team’s Epic Journey to Win Gold at the 1936 Olympics, by Daniel James Brown

Seven Women: And the Secret of Their Greatness, by Eric Metaxas

Richard Feynman

An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth, by Chris Hadfield (which actually had a strong influence on my decision to be a “real” author)

The Hiding Place, by Corrie ten Boom

Amazing Grace: William Wilberforce and the Heroic Campaign to End Slavery, by Eric Metaxas

Unlikely Heroes, by Ron Carter

To the Rescue: The Biography of Thomas S. Monson

A Long Walk to Water, by Linda Sue Park

Let It Go: A True Story of Tragedy and Forgiveness, by Chris Williams

Faith: Behind the Fences: A True Story of Survival in a Japanese Prison Camp, by Kelly Dispirito Taylor

 

What non-fiction books have made a difference to your life? Tell me in the comments.

M. C. Lee

Do You Want a Free Book?

Want to Join my ARC Team?

ARC means Advance Reader Copy. That means getting your hands on my book before it is actually published… For free! Mostly (I do ask for your email address in exchange, but there’s no monetary cost).

Why would I do something like that? Well, I’m hoping you’ll like the book and give it a nice review when it IS published. BUT you aren’t required to give a review, and you aren’t required to like the book, either. (I can only hope you do.)

Is this an absolutely finished copy? Not necessarily. It might not have made it 100% through proof-reading yet. It might be missing a few finishing touches, like chapter-break images or the map. But it will be the same story and pretty close to the finished product. (And if you are the kind of person who likes finding typos, you can tell me about them, and I’ll get proofreading to fix them!)

What kind of review do I want? Do you have to write a book report? Do I want you to lie?!? No, not at all. A short review is perfectly fine. Please, please do not lie. If you did like the book, just mention one or two reasons why, in your own words. (You aren’t limited, if you really feel like writing more.) Or click as many stars as you think the book deserves. Or don’t say anything, if you hate writing reviews that badly. If you don’t like the book, you can say that, too.

Are there any rules? You probably shouldn’t ask for a copy if you don’t THINK you’ll like it. And you should admit that you got an ARC from the author. (But not “in exchange for a review.” *whisper* That’s not allowed.) You should probably say that your opinions are your own, because, remember, I’m not requiring that you write a review in exchange for the free copy. (You can just take the book and run.)

How do you get your hands on this free ARC?! I have a sign-up list in the sidebar. All I ask for is your name and email for now. When the ARC is ready, I’ll ask if you want mobi or epub. I will keep your name and email for future ARC announcements, unless you unsubscribe, so consider if you’re okay with that. (I don’t sell your info, and you can unsubscribe anytime.) I will also be posting ARCs in a few places online, and I’ll update this post when I have them up.

Will I let everyone have a free copy? Well, no. If you wait too long, you’ll have to buy a copy to read, or ask your library to get one for you. This is a limited-time offer, so act quickly. 🙂

Are you ready for a free book?

M.C. Lee

Favorite Parenting & Family Books

Here are some of my favorite books about marriage, parenting, and family. Each category is in random order.

Normal Marriage

Romancing Your Better Half: Keeping Intimacy Alive in Your Marriage, by Rick Johnson

Happily Ever After: Six Secrets to a Successful Marriage, by Gary Chapman

Twelve Traps in Today’s Marriage and How to Avoid Them, by Brent A Barlow

Love that Lasts: Fourteen Secrets to a More Joyful, Passionate, and Fulfilling Marriage, by Gary B. Lundberg

Spousonomics: Using Economics to Master Love, Marriage, and Dirty Dishes, by Paula Szuchman

The Seven Principles for Making Marriage Work: A Practical Guide from the Country’s Foremost Relationship Expert, by John M Gottman

Love is a Choice: Making Your Marriage and Family Stronger, by Lynn G. Robbins

Normal Parenting

Parents and Adolescents Living Together, by Marion S. Forgatch

Cleaning House: A Mom’s Twelve-Month Experiment to Rid Her Home of Youth Entitlement, by Kay Wills Wyma

Your Child’s Strengths: Discover Them, Develop Them, Use Them, by Jennifer Fox

10 Secrets Wise Parents Know: Tried and True Things You Can Do to Raise Faithful, Confident, Responsible Children, by Bruce A Chadwick

Between Parent and Child, by Haim G. Ginott

What a Difference a Daddy Makes: The Lasting Imprint a Dad Leaves on His Daughter’s Life, by Kevin Leman

What a Difference a Mom Makes: The Indelible Imprint a Mom Leaves on Her Son’s Life, by Kevin Leman

25 Mistakes LDS Parents Make and How to Avoid Them, by Randal A. Wright

Real Moms: Making It Up As We Go, by Lisa Valentine Clark

Growing Up

Adulting: How to Become a Grown-up in 468 Easy(ish) Steps, by Kelly Williams Brown (if I remember correctly, it does have some bad language)

Choose Your Own Adulthood: A Small Book about the Small Choices that Make the Biggest Difference, by Hal Edward Runkel

Life Skills for Kids: Equipping Your Child for the Real World, by Christine M Field

Parenting Teens with Love and Logic: Preparing Adolescents for Responsible Adulthood, by Foster W. Kline

Teaching Your Children Responsibility, by Linda Eyre

Dealing With Serious Issues

Parenting Your Powerful Child: Bringing an End to the Everyday Battles, by Kevin Leman

When Bad Things Happen to Good Marriages: How to Stay Together When Life Pulls You Apart, by Les Parrott III

The Kazdin Method for Parenting the Defiant Child: With No Pills, No Therapy, No Contest of Wills, by Alan E Kazdin

Yes, Your Teen is Crazy, by Michael J. Bradley

The Time-Starved Family, by DeAnne Flynn

Your Defiant Teen: 10 Steps to Resolve Conflict and Rebuild Your Relationship, by Russell A Barkley

ADHD

Teenagers with ADD and ADHD, by Chris A Ziegler Dendy

Superparenting for ADD: An Innovative Approach to Raising Your Distracted Child, by Edward M. Hallowell

ADHD: What Every Parent Needs to Know, by the American Academy of Pediatrics

Holidays and Hope

I’m going to break my pattern a little here, and talk about something other than books. Don’t worry, I’ll still be talking about hope and happy endings.

Christmas is my second-favorite holiday, right after Easter. Sure, I like chocolate and presents and family time and music, but that’s not why these two are my favorite. In fact, I’m not at all fond of the bunny and the man in the red suit, though I do try not to spoil the “fun” for other people’s children.

No, my preference for these two days is all about the Main Character in the story they tell. (Yes, I can talk about stories without talking about books.) You know Who I mean. Christmas is when we celebrate His birth, and Easter, to use literary terms, was the climax of His story. In fact, Easter heralds the climax of all our stories, all our happy endings.

Christmas reminds me of the hope the world felt at His birth. Hope that things would get better. Hope that people could find a way. Hope that their problems would end, but they would go on to a better chapter. Hope for relief from sorrow and pain. Hope for repentance and forgiveness. Hope for reconciliation and renewal. Hope for eternal life with His Father and ours. Hope is a powerful way to keep us turning pages, and we don’t have to worry about our hope being betrayed. The happy ending is waiting for us.

Easter is all our hopes fulfilled. Easter is when our Author autographed the book of our happy endings. Sure, we still have to read our personal stories, live through the ups and downs and story turns. And many times, the middle of the story is not much fun, whether we wrote it ourselves or someone else did. But at the end of each of our stories, there is a happy ending, thanks to Him. If we let Him sign our book, then whatever sad, happy, funny, or painful story covers most of the pages, the last page will share His story, His glory, His hope and happy endings.

How can you ask for a better story than that?

So during these holidays, look to the Light, the Life, and the Way. Look for hope and happy endings.

Be merry in Christ,

M.C. Lee

Favorite Personality, Behavior, and Cognition Books

I think it probably says something about me that I have an entire category of these books and can make a post from just my favorites… Let’s ignore that, though, and you can browse my randomly ordered list of personality, behavior, and cognition books.

Personality (and yes, I know my type for almost every one of them (Reading People has some I don’t know))

Personality Types: Using the Enneagram for Self-Discovery, by Don Richard Riso

The Color Code: A New Way to See Yourself, Your Relationships, and Life, by Taylor Hartman

Reading People: How Seeing the World through the Lens of Personality Changes Everything, by Anne Bogel

The Four Tendencies: The Indispensable Personality Profiles That Reveal How to Make Your Life Better, by Gretch Ruben

The Five Love Languages: How to Express Heartfelt Commitment to Your Mate, by Gary Chapman

Behavior/Cognition

Feminist Fantasies, by Phyllis Schlafly

Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions, by Dan Ariely

Willpower: Rediscovering the Greatest Human Strength, by Roy F. Baumeister

You Can Never Get Enough of What You Don’t Need: The Quest for Contentment, by Mary Ellen Edmunds

Crucial Confrontations: Tools for Resolving Broken Promises, Violated Expectations, and Bad Behavior, by Kerry Patterson

The Unthinkable: Who Survives When Disaster Strikes – and Why, by Amanda Ripley

Vital Friends: The People You Can’t Afford to Live Without, by Tom Rath

How Will You Measure Your Life?, by Clayton M. Christensen

The Gift of Fear: Survival Signals That Protect Us from Violence, by Gavin de Becker

Aristotle Would Have Liked Oprah: And Other Philosophic Musings, by Ethel Diamond

The Definitive Book of Body Language, by Allan Pease

The Female Brain, by Louann Brizendine

On the Shoulders of Hobbits: The Road to Virtue with Tolkien and Lewis, by Louis Markos

Awkward: The Science of Why We’re Socially Awkward and Why That’s Awesome, by Ty Tashiro

Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking, by Malcolm Gladwell

Extremes: How to Keep Your Virtues from Becoming Vices, by Robert I. Eaton

The Highly Sensitive Person: How to Thrive When the World Overwhelms You, Elaine N. Aron

How We Decide, by Jonah Lehrer

The Gifts of Imperfection: Let Go of Who You Think You’re Supposed to Be and Embrace Who You Are, by Brene Brown

Every Body’s Talking: What We Say Without Words, by Donna M Jackson

Achieving Your Life Mission, by Randal A Wright

 

Enjoy learning more about how your brain works,

M. C. Lee