Category Archives: Book Reviews

“Historical” Fantasy Favorites

Here are juvenile and young adult fantasy books that I really like in “historical” fantasy subgenre. Some have a trace of magic. You can read the original post with more recommendations and links here.

Some books cross categories:

Hilari Bell has written several series and a bunch of standalones, and so far, I’ve liked everything. She’s good, I tell you.

Shannon Hale has also written a lot. Some of hers are rewritten fairy tales and some are unique. She can be a little trickier, but give her a shot.

My favorite of Jennifer A. Nielsen’s is the False Prince series. Even though I guessed the twist very, very early, it was still written very well. Basically, the royal family is all killed except for the exiled prince, and now villains want to put a pretender on the throne. The story follows a young man considered to be the best option for their fraud.

I have a complaint about V. Briceland. I don’t think the series is ended, and I want the next one! Preferably soon! Argh. Actually, one of my children called me a while back, asking me to identify a forgotten book for them, and Briceland was the answer. The series has good plots, great characters, and immersive writing. Though the series is connected, the stories are moderately stand-alone and move on to different characters. Setting is similar to a magical medieval Europe.

Mary Hoffman wrote a lovely portal fantasy series. Modern Earth teens get transferred to historical/magical Italy (please don’t yell at me if I forgot a setting).

Megan Whalen Turner’s Thief series is very good if you like slow, complex books with hidden turns, and very frustrating if you don’t. πŸ˜‰ They’re actually more fun to read the second time, because then you know where the jokes are.

Emily Rodda writes middle grade rather than young adult, but I still like them. Her heroes are rarely the brave and bold kind, but they find their courage to do what is right. The Deltora series also includes puzzles the readers can try to solve themselves.

Elizabeth Winthrop wrote a charming middle grade series about a magical castle in the attic, so I’d call it portal fantasy.

Holly Bennett writes about elves as well as humans, but not in a Tolkien way. She combines romance and adventure and families.

Gerald Morris is always my recommendation for King Arthur stories that are funny and heart-warming and not so much about King Arthur. And up until the last book, they managed to have happy endings, too.

Lloyd Alexander wrote tons of books, and they’re all good. Some are contemporary-ish, and some are portal-ish, but the Prydain Chronicles are firmly in the “historical” camp. I grew up on the series, and I’m still in love with the characters so much. When a reader told me my books “felt” like Alexander, I nearly cried.

The Great and Terrible Quest, by Margaret Lovett (one of my “ought to be a movie” books). Since the main character is only a boy, not even a teen, I suppose it could be considered middle grade, but somehow, it doesn’t seem that way. I read this book out loud to my family, and they all enjoyed it.

John Flanagan has several series set in the Ranger’s Apprentice world, which is clearly based on Earth even though he cleverly disguises the names. His characters are great, and though he could use a few more girls, the girls he does include are strong heroines without being cliches.

The Minnipin series, by Carol Kendall, is charming and funny. The heroes (male and female) save the day because they must, not because they are strong warriors or trained scholars or anything like that. In fact, the first heroes are the outcasts from the village. I love how Carol uses their real strengths to win the day, rather than forcing them into a trope.

The Princess and the Goblin (and Curdie sequel), by George MacDonald. I will admit, the old-fashioned language can be a bit of a barrier, but I love Curdie and Irene.

Silver Woven in My Hair, by Shirley Rousseau Murphy, is a Cinderella retelling with a realistic romance. So there.

The Ordinary Princess, by M.M. Kaye. Simple but sweet, and my favorite romance, even though it’s a children’s book. If you like friends-to-lovers, this is for you.

Crown Duel & Court Duel, and the Wren series, by Sherwood Smith. Crown/Court Duel is enemies-to-lovers, though the romance waits for the second book. Mel is a heroine who doesn’t fight well, doesn’t make the right choices, doesn’t know what she’s doing, but she just won’t give up. Wren is middle grade with another heroine who muddles through everything.

Cameron Dokey writes lovely fairy tale retellings with romance and magic.

Most of Robin McKinley. Some are fairy tales, some are original. She specializes in strong heroines, some who wear armor and swing weapons, and some who don’t.

Gail Carson Levine is funny and magical and romantic and you should definitely read the books instead of watching a certain movie…

Shattered Stone, by Robert Newman. I went to a lot of trouble to buy this book because my library didn’t have it and I wanted it in my house forever. I could spoil the romance for you, but I won’t. This is one of my feel-good favorites.

Bethany Wiggins’ Transference series is a cool take on dragons and an even cooler take on romance. As in, realistic instead of instalove or lameness. She also has very realistic family relationships.

I hope something sounds like fun (or all of them!) and that you get to settle down with a nice book.

Happy reading,
Marty C. Lee

Favorite YA Sci-Fi

I used to have this listed with YA fantasy, but for my new “expanded” lists, I decided to break them out.

“Contemporary” Science Fiction (not all set in current day, but less intense science)

The True Meaning of Smekday, by Adam Rex (SO much better than the movie!). Alien invasion meets humor and cross-country road trip to save Mom.

The Girl with the Silver Eyes, by Willo Davis Roberts. Four kids with psychic powers from a prenatal drug find out about each other and conspire to get together.

Pamela F. Service. She also writes very good fantasy, but The Reluctant God is time travel, and Stinker from Space and Weirdos Unite are aliens-come-to-Earth.

The Giver, by Lois Lowry (but unfortunately not the sequels). It’s ever so much better than the movie, too, which changed a few vital elements in not-very-smart ways.

Alexander Key. The Forgotten Door, Witch Mountain (movies are okay, honestly), and more. I bought Forgotten Door when I moved somewhere that had a library that didn’t stock it.

Charlie & the Chocolate Factory series, by Roald Dahl. Not too much science in book 1, but book 2 shoots into space. And yes, the crazy poems are in the book, not just the movie.

“Heavier” Science Fiction

Have Space Suit–Will Travel, by Robert Heinlein (no, I don’t like all his stuff). A teenage boy and a young girl are kidnapped and marooned in space. If they can’t find friends among aliens, they’ll never get home again.

Stephanie Harrington series, by David Weber. No, I haven’t gotten into his other stuff, even the rest of the Harringtons, but I do like the Treecat Wars. I think I’m more of a “friendly alien” type reader than a “space opera” reader.

Devil on My Back series, by Monica Hughes. Post-apocalptic “utopian” (really dystopian, of course), where the hero doesn’t WANT to upend his society but finds out truths he eventually can’t ignore.

Ready Player One, by Ernest Cline. RPG-lit. Here is also where I admit that although I liked the first one a lot, I really, really didn’t like the sequel.

Alan Gratz. Alternate history steampunk where seven unlikely heroes band together to save the day against hideous giants. Probably more middle grade than young adult, but I’ll leave it here, anyway.

Douglas Arthur Hill. Some of his fit better under fantasy, but the ColSec series is sci fi, as are a lot of others. ColSec is humans-crashland-on-alien-world, and the aliens are NOT friendly.

Janet Edwards. I admit, I haven’t read all her stuff yet, because my library won’t stock it, but I really like her Earth Girl series. Post-apocalyptic, where the slow decline of Earth was solved when most humans migrated to other planets. The few that stayed behind because they were allergic to other worlds are considered sub-human, and one of them decides to prank an entire archaeology class. It all goes wrong, of course.

Adrian McKinty’s Lighthouse trilogy is another aliens & humans story, with a disabled main character. (He thinks disabled, but he does more with one arm than most people do with two.)

Sylvia Engdahl (sci fi with a fantasy feel). Enchantress from the Stars has dual POV, one sci fi and one fantasy, and the contrast is super cool. The Far Side of Evil is more sci fi. I like Enchantress better, but Far Side is still good.

A Wrinkle in Time series, by Madeline L’Engle. Classics for a reason. Each book is different (space, time, size, aliens, angels…), but they all talk about the difference one person can make to the world/universe.

Timothy Zahn’s Dragon series. Also sci-fi with the feel of fantasy, and another friendly-aliens story. Okay, it’s a some-friendly some-enemy aliens story… With a touch of mystery and a really cool twist on dragons.

Let me know if you read any of these, and what you thought.

Happy reading,
M. C. Lee

YA Fantasy with Princesses, Dragons, or Magic

Some of my favorite YA fantasies with princesses, dragons, and/or magic, in random order:

Patricia C. Wrede: Lyra Chronicles are unrelated stories set in the same world. My favorite is The Raven Ring, but they’re all good. Frontier Magic is kind of an urban fantasy series, except “urban” is wilderness. Anyway, it’s about twins, the seventh son of a seventh son and his sister, the thirteenth child. Cecilia and Kate is historical fantasy with magic, and so is Mairelon. The Enchanted Forest Chronicles tell of a princess who seeks out a dragon to avoid an unwanted marriage. One of the short stories that goes with the series is called The Frying Pan of Doom, and it’s a hoot. Wrede also has good standalones.

Clare B. Dunkle: The Hollow Sky (sci fi) is good, but The Hollow Kingdom is better. Goblins and elves in new ways, with strong heroines who aren’t necessarily good fighters. To quote the king’s advisor (more or less), “One of your parents saved the kingdom, and sometimes I forget which.”

Michelle Knudsen: Trelian series. What are you supposed to do when you find a dragon egg in the forest? Keep it, of course. But how do you tell your parents?

Jonathan Stroud: Bartimaeus series, about an apprentice who steals a magic amulet, calls a demon, but things don’t go exactly as he planned. If you like the footnotes, check out Terry Pratchett.

Laurence Yep: any of his fantasies are good, but I’m particularly fond of his Dragon Steel series. If you’ve been looking for a good Asian fantasy, start with this classic.

Garth Nix: Abhorsen series. On one side of The Wall is the normal world, with no magic except when there’s a strong breeze from the other side.

Brandon Mull: Fablehaven. Magical creatures in a secret reserve. All is well, until everything goes wrong and the children have to save the day.

Elizabeth Haydon: The Lost Journals of Ven Polypheme. Ven is a shipbuilder’s son, and on his first “check out the ship” voyage, he’s kidnapped and lost. He’s a very kind hero.

Jane Yolen (also found in adult fantasy): She has a LOT of books, but I’ll mention The Seelie Wars, in which a hostage faerie prince and a common human reluctantly team up against both sides of the faeries. The Pit Dragon series is kind of a sci-fi/fantasy blend where dragons are perfectly natural creatures who are mostly raised in breeding barns and used in wagered fights like cocks or bears.

Dawn Cook: Truth series. A girl searches for her missing father and discovers she has magic. With a boy from the plains, she must fight an evil sorcerer to win back her father’s magic book. And there are dragons, but they aren’t what you think…

Julie Kagawa: Fey series. A teenage girl discovers her father was really a faerie king, and she has the power to save—or destroy—the fae.

Sheila A. Nielson: Forbidden Sea series. Mermaids! Can a girl save her younger sister from a vengeful mermaid? (First book is trad-published, second is indie.)

Lou Anders: Thrones and Bones series. Elves, giants, and trolls in a setting reminiscent of old Norse.

James M. Ward: Halcyon Blythe. Steampunk with dragons. Halcyon is a sailor on a dragon-frigate. No, the ship doesn’t hunt dragons; the ship IS a dragon.

Elizabeth Kerner: The Tale of Lanen Kaeler. Lanen has dreamed of meeting dragons all her life, so when she gets the chance to go to their island, nothing will stop her.

Andre Norton: Halfblood Chronicles series. Elves rule all the known lands, keeping humans as slaves. But there is a prophecy of a halfblood who can destroy their reign…

Tui T. Sutherland: Wings of Fire. All dragons, all the time. Different races of dragons in different lands, always fighting until five unlikely dragonets become friends.

Jessica Day George: also LOTS of books. Dragon Slippers, in which a girl in need of a job accidentally gains the one thing that allows her to control dragons. The Rose Legacy, where horses are forbidden and so is magic, but both are returning. Castle Glower, where the royal castle rearranges its rooms on a regular basis and one young princess holds the key to defeating the enemy. The Princesses of Westfalin, where each new book is a different retold fairytale about another sister in the royal family.

C.S. Lewis: Narnia, which is accessed through a few magical gates that throw unsuspecting Earthlings into a land with talking animals and satyrs and magic.

Pamela F. Service: Winter of Magic’s Return duology. Many years in the future, after an apocalypse, Merlin returns, but can he find his magic in the new world?

Tamora Pierce: Tortall series (plural). Strong heroines and honorable heroes, warriors and gods, magic and monsters. For a cleaner standard, skip the first series, which has a “relationship” (undescribed) and some accidental nudity.

Knee-Deep in Thunder, by Sheila Moon: a boy finds himself in a world where insects are his size and monsters roam free. In order to get home again, he must help the animals defeat the monsters.

Liz McCraine (indie): her Kingdom of Aggadorn series has magic, the occasional princess, and unicorns. The series is lightly connected, but you can start anywhere. I love her characters, her realistic (and clean) romances, and that there is always a main plot besides the romance.

Laura M. Drake (indie): Unexpected Magic. If you like Harry Potter and The Last Airbender, then you might like this elemental-magic academy series.

Lloyd Alexander: Chronicles of Prydain. A pig-keeper’s apprentice gets tangled in dangerous matters when he accidentally rescues a prince from a dark lord. With an odd assortment of companions, including a princess, a dwarf, a bard, and a whatever-he-is, his quest to find himself will change the kingdom. I thought it was a great compliment when people told me my books “felt” like Prydain, because I love the series.

M.L. Farb (indie): King series. When a silent revolutionary and a spoiled princeling meet, the kingdom will change forever. I’m not really happy with the romance of book 2, but the characters and the writing are as good as book 1.

Robin McKinley: The Hero and the Crown. Aerin is the daughter of the king and a witch. Now dragons are stalking the land, and she is the only one who can fight them. While I would classify Aerin as a strong heroine, it’s her honesty, her determination, and her desire to protect her land that make her the hero.

And if you’ll forgive the self-promo, I’ll mention my own series, Unexpected Heroes. The first book is Wind of Choice: When their world is threatened by feuding gods, four strangers bury their differences and forge an alliance. Only the combined talents of a winged young man, a gilled islander, a shapeshifter, and a fire mage can prevent utter destruction. Each book switches to a new main character and adds a different secondary genre (mystery in book 2, romance in 3, spies & conspiracies in 4). If you want to visit the world first, Unexpected Tales is a free collection of short stories.

Enjoy, and feel free to comment if you found something you liked.

Marty C. Lee

If you missed any of the blog posts in this tour, you can catch up here:

March 1, 8, 14, 21, 28 Storyquest Academy
March 2nd Ellie Naomi
March 3, 17 Julie Gilbert
March 4th Jasmine Natasha
March 5th Liz Delton
March 6, 11, 26 Mark Hansen
March 7th Ian Vroon
March 9, 19, 30 Nicholas Kotar
March 10th J.M. Hackman
March 12, 20 Courtney Kasper
March 13, 29 Debbie Schreffler
March 15th Steven Guglich
March 16th Laurie Lucking
March 18th Meg Dendler
March 22, 25, 31 Molly Casperson
March 23rd D.J. Edwardson
March 24th Marty C Lee (here!)
March 27th Allison Tebo

Favorite Adult Fantasy Books

Since nobody voted for anything else, *ahem, I’m talking to you…* I decided to go back through my oldest posts and see what I can break out in more detail.

I read about 40% fantasy, according to Goodreads. It’s not a majority, but it is my largest category. I read more YA than adult, mostly for content reasons, but there are still adult books that cross my path. Here are some of my favorite adult fantasy books and authors. (And yes, I have enjoyed many, many more books that are listed here. These are my very favorites, for one reason or another.)

In random order:

David Eddings, particularly the Belgariad and Mallorean, which I’ve probably read at least a dozen times. When Guardians of the West first came out, I started reading it in the store while I waited for my parents. I hit a certain scene with a thunderstorm and laughed so hard that everyone stared at me. I also like the Elenium and Tamuli and the side stories of the Bel/Mall series. I’m not a fan of The Dreamers series.

J.R.R. Tolkien. Okay, I must admit I haven’t waded through all the backstories, especially those put out by Christopher. But the original four (Hobbit + LOTR) are deep favorites. I started reading them when I was eight years old (all four), and I used to read them every few months. When my sister dropped her book and lost her bookmark, she called me to find out where she was. LOL. My husband hates watching the movies with me because I complain when they ruin things. Despite spending so much time with them, I don’t write like JRR in either content or voice. Sorry?

Brandon Sanderson (also found in Sci Fi and YA fantasy, and excluding a few of his more violent books). Mistborn had a few scenes I had to skip, so I refused to read Way of Kings when it looked like more of the same. But I liked Elantris, Warbreaker, & Wax & Wayne. I think all of his YA books made the list, too.

Mercedes Lackey (not everything of hers, but a lot of it). I like most of the very extensive Valdemar series, though the short story collections aren’t as good. I like Bardic Voices, Fairy Tales, and the Hunter series. I liked the Elemental Masters for a long time, but the recent ones have not been my cup of cocoa. Obsidian Mountain/Enduring Flame and the 500 Kingdoms series I like with severe reservations for the adult content (violence and other). I’ve read several of her other series, but they don’t make my favorites list.

Sharon Shinn, including Castle Auburn, Twelve Houses (with reservations), and Gateway. My favorites, though are her YA series, Safe-Keepers.

Terry Pratchett. Not fond of his early one-chapter-per-book style, but his writing is great. I used to be fonder of the Wizard track, then the Witches, but the Watch grew on me until it became my favorite.

Shanna Swendson. The Enchanted, Inc and Fairy Tale series are urban fantasy. Rebel Mechanics is steampunk and YA. I’m eclectic enough to like all three. πŸ˜‰

Michael J. Sullivan. I only discovered him a few years ago, but I think I’ve read everything he’s written, including his “how I wrote it” stuff. A lot of the time, I find elf/dwarf stuff to be too derivative to enjoy, but Michael is just plain good. And sneaky, very sneaky. He’s very good at throwing in little clues that end up being very important in hindsight.

Patricia Briggs is best known for her Mercy Thompson series, I think, but I’ve actually been reading her for years before she started writing about werewolves. (And some of that series are great, but some are questionable for me.) My favorite is her Hurog series, but Raven and Sianim/Aralorn and Hob’s Bargain are all good.

Martha Wells. I like both the Murderbot series (sci fi) and Ile-Rien (fantasy), but my favorites are the Raksura (let’s call it alien fantasy, since the POV is very non-human).

Joanne Bertin’s Dragonlord series. Again, I have to add reservations. Why do so many adult fantasy series think it’s necessary to add certain elements? On the good side, it has a unique tack to the dragon genre.

Mel Odom managed to make me cry over unlikely characters and then turn around and laugh out loud. He’s a master of turning a trope on its head.

Magic Kingdom for Sale–Sold, by Terry Brooks (the rest of the series is readable, but not as good). A millionaire buys a “fantasy kingdom,” expending it to be a fraud—but it’s real. Now he has to figure out how to really be a king before an evil knight takes everything, along with his head.

Mary Robinette Kowal writes sci fi (Lady Astronaut et al: colonize Mars in the 50’s because of an apocalypse) and romantic fantasy (Glamourist Histories: Jane Austen with magic), and I like both. She made me cry, too, the stinker. (And if you’re a writer, you should definitely listen to Brandon Sanderson and Mary Robinette Kowal on Writing Excuses.)

Innkeeper/Sweep series, by Ilona Andrews. I tried her other stuff and didn’t care for it, but I do like the innkeepers. When I remember to check, I read them in serial on her website, but between books, I frequently forget and then have to catch up or ask the library to order the next book. *cough*

Happy reading,
M. C. Lee

Favorite Education & Homeschool Books

I was homeschooled for a long time (and wish it had been longer). I homeschooled my children until they said they wanted to go to public school. So, with that experience behind me, here are my favorite education & homeschool books (that aren’t textbooks). It’s a short list, but that’s okay

ADHD: What Every Parent Needs to Know, by the American Academy of Pediatrics

Teenagers with ADD & ADHD, by Chris A. Zeigler Dendy

You Can Teach Your Child Successfully, by Ruth Beechick

Cleaning House, by Kay Wills Wyma

Life Skills for Kids, by Christine M. Field

Homeschooling: The Middle Years, by Shari Henry

The Well-Trained Mind, by Susan Wise Bauer

The New School, by Glenn Harlan Reynolds

Homeschooler’s College Admissions Handbook, by Cafi Cohen

Fish in a Tree, by Lynda Mullaly Hunt (fiction)

Schooled, by Gordan Korman (fiction)

If anybody out there wants to write some good homeschooling fiction, there’s obviously a hole waiting to be filled. I’m tired of reading about the odd homeschooler down the block that doesn’t fit in until he goes to public school. Boo! Most homeschoolers are well-educated, well-adjusted, and well-socialized. And that’s generally BECAUSE of homeschool, not DESPITE it. And yes, homeschoolers go to college just fine. Even if they stay at home through high school.

Just as a thought, if you or someone you know is dealing with remote school because of… you know, Covid… wouldn’t it be easier to take charge of school yourself and do it your way instead of trying to meet public school expectations at home? It’s just a thought, so don’t throw tomatoes at me. πŸ™‚

Happy reading,
Marty C. Lee

 

Favorite Action-Adventure Books

Before I start, I’ll warn you that I have a wide variety of books listed as “action-adventure” on my list. I won’t bother you with the ones I didn’t really like, and I’ll sort the ones I did, but as you’re looking through and see the mishmash that made the cut, just remember that I warned you. πŸ˜‰

Adult

Bad Penny, by John D. Brown. Mystery.

This Just In, by Kelly Blair. Mystery

The Unthinkable: Who Survives When Disaster Strikes–and Why, by Amanda Ripley. Nonfiction.

Shipwreck at the Bottom of the World, by Jennifer Armstrong. Biography.

I sense a theme in my adult adventure books… mystery or nonfiction…

Young Adult

Code Orange, by Caroline B. Cooney. Contemporary. Sort of a medical thriller, sort of a spy thriller. Mostly a boy trying to avoid the consequences of his bad ideas.

Pigboy, by Vicki Grant. Contemporary. School field trip gone very, very wrong.

Gallagher Girls series, by Ally Carter. Contemporary. Teen spy school.

Brotherband Chronicles series, by John Flanagan. Fantasy.

Reckoners series, by Brandon Sanderson. Science fiction. Superheroes gone bad.

Holes, by Louis Sachar. Contemporary. Juvenile detention gone bad.

Abhorsen series, by Garth Nix. Fantasy. Content warning for zombies (of a sort) and occasional grossness.

Black Stallion, by Walter Farley. Contemporary. The rest of the series isn’t bad, but the first one is best.

The Gideon trilogy, by Linda Buckley-Archer. Historical.

Percy Jackson series, by Rick Riordan. Contemporary fantasy.

Middle Grade

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, by Roald Dahl. Contemporary fantasy.

Brave Margaret, by Robert D. San Souci. Historical.

Ascendance series, by Jennifer A. Nielsen. Fantasy.

The Mysterious Benedict Society series, by Trenton Lee Stewart. Mystery.

Cat Royal series, by Julia Golding. Historical.

Adventurer’s Wanted series, by M.L. Forman. Portal fantasy.

Alcatraz series, by Brandon Sanderson. Portal fantasy.

Letters from Wolfie, by Patti Sherlock. Historical.

Larklight series, by Phillip Reeve. Fantasy.

Fablehaven, by Brandon Mull. Portal/contemporary fantasy. Yeah, it’s a bit tricky to classify exactly.

The Adventures of Pippi Longstocking, by Astrid Lindgren. Oldie but goodie.

 

And that’s all, folks. Considering that a lot of these are series, they should keep you busy for at least a FEW days. πŸ™‚

Happy reading,
Marty C. Lee

Horror Recommendations

This list will be shorter than usual, because I read little horror and like even less of it. Nonetheless, for Halloween, here are my recommendations. I am not responsible for any nightmares!

Fairly Safe for Teens (mileage may vary)

Oddly Enough series, by Bruce Coville

Alfred Hitchcock

Ghosts, Gales and Gold, by Edgar Rowe Snow

Monsters, Ghoulies, and Creepy Creatures, by Lee Bennett Hopkins

50 Great Horror Stories, by John Canning

13 Goblins, & 13 Ghosts, by Dorothy Gladys Spicer

The Scariest Stories You’ve Ever Heard, by Katherine Burt

Companions of the Night, by Vivian Vande Velde

The Thing at the Foot of the Bed, by Maria Leach

More Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark, by Alvin Schwartz

Ghosts, Ghouls, & Other Horrors, by Berhardt J. Hurwood

Tales of Mystery and Terror, by Marjorie P. Katz

Serafina series, by Robert Beatty

Daughter of Smoke and Bone, by Laini Taylor

Warning: Adult Content (of various types)

Diana Tregarde series, Obsidian Mountain series, by Mercedes Lackey

World of Prime series, by M. C. Planck

The Others series, by Anne Bishop

Unbroken, by Laura Hillenbrand

October Daye series, by Seanan McGuire

Sunshine, by Robin McKinley

 

Hmm, that was a longer list than I expected. Anyway, there you go!

Shuddering,
Marty C. Lee

Steampunk Recommendations

Here we go with another list of “books I like.” This one is Steampunk and Gaslamp (think: alternate history with magic or advanced tech). When I first decided to do a post in this category, I thought I wouldn’t have much to offer you that I liked. Then I finished classifying books as steampunk and discovered I have 144 rated! Here are my favorites.

As ever, my suggestions for age groups are loose. Within age groups, they are listed in random order.

Middle Grade

The League of Seven series, by Alan Gratz

Larklight, by Phillip Reeve

City of Ember, by Jeanne DuPrau (there’s a series, but the first one is by far the best and better than the movie)

Mysteries of Cove series, by J. Scott Savage

Young Adult

The Cecilia & Kate series, by Patricia C. Wrede

Frontier Magic series, by Patricia C. Wrede

The Extraordinary Adventures of the Athena Club series, by Theodora Goss

The Iron Fey series (plural), by Julie Kagawa

The Mortal Instruments series, by Cassandra Clare (Fair warning: I got tired of the world after the first series or two. Please don’t throw tomatoes.)

Incarceron series, by Catherine Fisher

Storm Thief, by Chris Wooding

Finishing School series, by Gail Carriger (warning: some of her other series are adult, and I do mean adult)

Monster Blood Tattoo series, by D.M. Cornish

Rebel Mechanics series, by Shanna Swendson

Leviathan series, by Scott Westerfield

Howl’s Moving Castle, by Dianna Wynne Jones

The Rithmatist, by Brandon Sanderson (Hey, Brandon, where’s the next one??)

Stoker and Holmes series, by Colleen Gleason

The Elemental Trilogy, by Sherry Thomas

Adult

The Goblin Emperor, by Katherine Addison (honestly, I didn’t think of this one as steampunk, but I guess it is). I recommend you flip to the back and find the explanation of names BEFORE you start the book.

Steampunk Proper Romance series, by Nancy Allen Campbell

The Silvered, by Tanya Huff

Raising Steam, by Terry Pratchett (the rest of his aren’t really steampunk, but they’re generally hilarious)

Mistborn series (plural, sort of), by Brandon Sanderson

The Fall of Ile-Rien series, by Martha Wells

Glamourist Histories series, by Mary Robinette Kowal (Regency romance with magic)

 

Since most of those are series, you should have enough to read for at least a few days. πŸ™‚

Happy reading,
M. C. Lee

Favorite Historical Books, #3

I’ve been dividing my favorite history books into three sections for you: 1) ancient history, 2) medieval and renaissance history, and 3) 1700-and-later. More or less. πŸ˜‰ You know I’m not always very precise…

So here’s the 1700+ History Favorites randomly within each category:

Young Adult Mysteries

The Case of the Baskerville Irregulars series, by Robert Newman

Enola Holmes series, by Nancy Springer

The Extraordinary Adventures of the Athena Club series, by Theodora Goss

The Agency series, by Y.S. Lee

Cat Royal series, by Julia Golding

Young Adult Romance (more or less)

Little Women, by Louisa May Alcott

Anne of Green Gables series, by Lucy Maud Montgomery

Quaker trilogy, by Ann Turnbull

Red Moon at Sharpsburg, by Rosemary Wells

The Bracelet series, by Jennie Hansen

Dark Mirror series, by M. J. Putney

The Raging Quiet, by Sherryl Jordan

Boston Jane series, by Jennifer L. Holm

Watch for a Tall White Sail, by Margaret E. Bell

A Death-Struck Year, by Makiia Lucier (also a fine example of what a YA romance ought to be)

Water Song, by Suzanne Weyn

Other Young Adult

Gideon the Cut-Purse trilogy, by Linda Buckley-Archer

A True and Faithful Narrative, by Katherine Sturtevant

The Secret Garden, and A Little Princess, by Frances Hodson Burnett

Peter Raven Under Fire, by Michael Molloy

Montmorency series, by Eleanor Updale

Blossom Culp series, by Richard Peck

Stealing Freedom, by Elisa Carbone (biography)

Treasures of the Snow, by Patricia St. John

Sarah, Plain and Tall, by Patricia MacLachlan

Stranje House series, by Kathleen Baldwin

The Little House series, by Laura Ingalls Wilder

Under a Painted Sky, by Lee Stacey

Charlotte’s Rose, by Ann Edwards Cannon

The Great Brain series, by John D. Fitzgerald

I Am David, by Anne Holm

The Silent Bells, by William MacKellar

The War That Saved My Life, by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley

A Long Way from Chicago, by Richard Peck

The Little White Horse, by Elizabeth Goudge

The House of Sixty Fathers, by Meindert DeJong

King of the Wind, by Marguerite Henry

Where the Red Fern Grows, by Wilson Rawls (it took three of us to finish it, because we cried too hard to talk)

A Long Walk to Water, by Linda Sue Park (biography)

Mabel Riley, by Marthe Jocelyn

Her Own Song, by Ellen Howard

Charlie Bucket series, by Roald Dahl (yes, it’s a series!)

The Gawgon and the Boy, by Lloyd Alexander

Shanghai Shadows, by Lois Ruby

Adult (I’m skipping romances, since they have their own post)

Seven Miracles that Saved America, by Chris Stewart (non-fiction)

The 5000 Year Leap, by Cleon W. Skousen (non-fiction)

The Scarlet Pimpernel, by Emmuska Orczy

Daughters in my Kingdom, by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (non-fiction)

The Work and the Glory series, by Gerald N. Lund

The Ghost Map: The Story of London’s Most Terrifying Epidemicβ€”and How It Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World, by Steven Johnson

Throstleford, by Susan Evans McCloud

Mary Russell series, by Laurie R. King (Sherlock Holmes when older)

A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens

Sherlock Holmes series, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

A Night of Blacker Darkness, by Dan Wells

The Unthinkable: Who Survives When Disaster Strikes – and Why, by Amanda Ripley (non-fiction)

Lost Off the Grand-Banks, by Arthur Catherall

The Boys in the Boat, by Gregory Mone (biography)

Charlie’s Monument, by Blaine M. Yorgason

The Diddakoi, by Rumer Godden

Lady Astronaut series, by Mary Robinette Kowal

White Fang, by Jack London

 

Whew! And if that doesn’t keep you busy for a few days, you must read faster than I do!

What favorite of yours isn’t on this list?

Happy reading,
M. C. Lee

Favorite Historical Books, #2

I’ve been dividing my favorite history books into three sections for you: 1) ancient history, 2) medieval and renaissance history, and 3) 1700-and-later. More or less. πŸ˜‰ You know I’m not always very precise…

So here’s the Medieval/Renaissance History Favorites randomly within each category:

Juvenile

Ming Lo Moves the Mountain, by Arnold Lobel (picture book)

Brave Margaret, by Robert D. San Souci

The Castle Behind Thorns, by Merrie Haskell

A Murder for Her Majesty, by Beth Hilgartner

Dragon Cauldron series, by Laurence Yep

Time Cat, by Lloyd Alexander

Dragon Keeper, by Carole Wilkinson

Young Adult (several of these are “fantasy in historical setting”)

The Case of the Marble Monster, by I.G. Edmonds (short Japanese mysteries)

Seven Daughters and Seven Sons, by Barbara Cohen

Waterfall series, by Lisa Tawn Bergren

The Outlaws of Sherwood, by Robin McKinley

The Squire’s Tale series, by Gerald Morris (starts off hilarious and ends up so sad, fair warning)

Outlaw Princess of Sherwood, by Nancy Springer

Stravaganza series, and The Falconer’s Knot, by Mary Hoffman

The Ranger’s Apprentice & Brotherband series (plural), by John Flanagan (fantasy in semi-historical setting)

Rhiannon, by Vicki Grove

The Queen’s Thief series, by Megan Whalen Turner

Toads and Diamonds, by Heather Tomlinson

The Cassaforte Chronicles series, by V. Briceland

Sisters of the Sword, by Maya Snow

The Wild Orchid, by Cameron Dokey

The Edge on the Sword, by Rebecca Tingle

Kingdom of Aggadorn series, by Liz McCraine (fantasy romance)

Samurai Detective series, by Dorothy Hoobler (based on the real Judge Ooka, who also appears in The Marble Monster, earlier on this list)

Adult

The Count of Monte Cristo, by Alexandre Dumas (and here I’m going to let down you traditionalists by recommending you find an abridgment that cuts out all the political commentary of the day)

Seven Women: And the Secret of their Greatness, by Eric Metaxas (crosses time periods) (non-fiction)

Other Heroes in The Book of Mormon, by Jay Fullmer (non-fiction)

Simon the Coldheart, by Georgette Heyer (romance)

Firebird, by Mercedes Lackey

MacLeod and de Piaget series, by Lynn Kurland (romance)

Ladyhawke, by Joan D. Vinge

Chronicles of Brother Cadfael, by Ellis Peters

Eifelheim, by Michael Flynn

 

There you go! That should give you enough for a few days. πŸ˜‰ Did I miss something that should be on the list?

Happy reading,
M. C. Lee